However, my dictionary says it comes from an Anglo-Saxon word. Getting rid of these nagging infinities has probably occupied far more effort than was spent in originating the theories.

etymology of dog

The etymology section is very informative. All I can really suggest is that it seems more plausible for us to have patchy coverage of non-standard registers than patchy coverage of what was perceived of as more "fit for writing". It reminded me of several cases in which a species name as taken over the genus name. I found this on the net: For centuries, the standard English word for a canine was 'hound' or 'hund'. Neil Coffey 18k 1 32

Cognate with Scots dug (“dog”). The original meaning seems to have been a common dog, as opposed to a well-bred one.

Dogs Westrobothnian lemmas Westrobothnian adjectives. Same word has become archaic in Standard Estonian and Finnish. Also, sometimes the production team and the Duty Elves miss fine academic details like this. Dogs Westrobothnian lemmas Westrobothnian adjectives. Interestingly, perro , the Spanish for dog has a similarly obscure history.

etymology of dog

Dogs Westrobothnian lemmas Westrobothnian adjectives. Profile Log in to check your private messages. While the word 'dog' or 'dogca', at least dates to late Old English ie rather than 'late Middle English' as Stephen said it is cited in the OED only half a dozen times before Shakespeare's time in the late 16th century.

If you think a redditor-made map is of low quality, write a comment detailing how it could be done better, and don't just downvote. This page was last edited on 24 December , at Just as a footnote, some of the celestial beings which were shared by the Indo-Iranian branch of the IEs, became opposite in temperament and characteristics after Indian and Iranian tribes ramified. But your point is still valid:

TIL, I've always thought it was peni. Nautical English intransitive verbs British English English basic words English three-letter words en: Want to add to the discussion?

etymology of the word "dog"

Borrowed from English dog. The preposterous altruism too! Occitan gos Spanish perro Uncertain.

Mankind The Story of All of Us: Domesticating the Dog - History

It was recently reported on QI that the origin of the word "dog" is a big mystery. It even gets adopted in other languages Danish dogge , and the French for mastiff, dogue.

But your point is still valid: My mobile-phone battery has run out of charge and is no longer able to function.

It comes from a Germanic root khursa- which had Norse, German and Dutch versions. Only certain races, such as the "Danish dog" are litterally translated by us "Deense dog".

etymology of dog

dog (n.) "quadruped of the genus Canis," Old English docga, a late, rare word, used in at least one Middle English source in reference specifically to a powerful .

The dogs were too hot to touch. The dog barked all night long. Are they all accounted for? Want to add to the discussion?

etymology of dog

Borrowed from English dog. The etymology section is very informative. My mobile-phone battery has run out of charge and is no longer able to function.

Not a dog’s chance, or one more impenetrable etymology. Anatoly Liberman's column on word origins, The Oxford Etymologist, appears on the OUPblog each Wednesday. The word dog is the bete noire of English etymology.

Not that anyone can prove it, of course. D pronaunced kutse looks similar to hungarian but i dont know etymology. It reminded me of several cases in which a species name as taken over the genus name. The dog barked all night long. The captive made no resistance and came not only quietly but in a series of eager little rushes like a timid dog on a choke chain. Submit a new text post.

Animal Documentary 2015- And Man Created Dog- National Geographic

Borrowed from English dog. When Timothy and Julia hurried up the staircase to the bedroom floor, where a considerable commotion was taking place, Tim took Barry Leach with him.

etymology of dog

Want to add to the discussion? Obviously, the French chien never caught on, Normans or not. Some of the most beautiful and thus appealing physical theories, including quantum electrodynamics and quantum gravity, have been dogged for decades by infinities that erupt when theorists try to prod their calculations into new domains. Wouldn't call a chihuahua a 'hound' would you? My dogs are barking! Or just a nonsense word that had great mouth-feel and caught on Log in or sign up in seconds.

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